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Van Gogh
Author: Steven W. Naifeh, Gregory White Smith
Publisher: Random House Incorporated
ISBN: 0375507485
Pages: 953
Year: 2011
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Draws on newly available primary sources to present an in-depth, accessible profile that offers revisionist assessments of the influential artist's turbulent life and genius works.
The Last Van Gogh
Author: Alyson Richman
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 042521267X
Pages: 308
Year: 2006
View: 822
Read: 298
In 1890, Van Gogh arrives at Auvers-sur-Oise, a peaceful French village, to spend the summer under the care of Doctor Gachet, a homeopathic doctor and art collector, where the painter will spend the final days of his life creating more than seventy paintings, including two portraits of young Marguerite Gachet, who finds herself drawn to the troubled artist. Original. 40,000 first printing.
The Letters of Vincent Van Gogh
Author: Vincent Van Gogh
Publisher: Magpie
ISBN: 1780333293
Pages: 400
Year: 2011-08-18
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A carefully selected edition of the letters of Van Gogh. For this great artist it is unusually difficult to separate his life from his work. These letters reveal his inner turmoil and strength of character, and provide an extraordinary insight into the intensity and creativity of his artistic life.
Vincent Van Gogh
Author: Jan Greenberg, Sandra Jordan
Publisher: Yearling
ISBN: 0307548740
Pages: 144
Year: 2009-02-04
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Vincent Van Gogh: Portrait of an Artist was named a Robert F. Sibert Honor book by the ALA. This is the enthralling biography of the nineteenth-century Dutch painter known for pioneering new techniques and styles in masterpieces such as Starry Night and Vase with Sunflowers. The book cites detailed primary sources and includes a glossary of artists and terms, a biographical time line, notes, a bibliography, and locations of museums that display Van Gogh’s work. It also features a sixteen-page insert with family photographs and full-color reproductions of many of Van Gogh’s paintings. Vincent Van Gogh was named an ALA Notable Book and an ALA Best Book for Young Adults and has been selected as a Common Core State Standards Text Exemplar (Grades 6–8, Historical/Social Studies) in Appendix B. From the Hardcover edition.
Vincent van Gogh
Author: Victoria Charles
Publisher: Parkstone International
ISBN: 1780427395
Pages: 200
Year: 2012-01-17
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Vincent van Gogh’s life and work are so intertwined that it is hardly possible to observe one without thinking of the other. Van Gogh has indeed become the incarnation of the suffering, misunderstood martyr of modern art, the emblem of the artist as an outsider. An article, published in 1890, gave details about van Gogh’s illness. The author of the article saw the painter as “a terrible and demented genius, often sublime, sometimes grotesque, always at the brink of the pathological.” Very little is known about Vincent’s childhood. At the age of eleven he had to leave “the human nest”, as he called it himself, for various boarding schools. The first portrait shows us van Gogh as an earnest nineteen year old. At that time he had already been at work for three years in The Hague and, later, in London in the gallery Goupil & Co. In 1874 his love for Ursula Loyer ended in disaster and a year later he was transferred to Paris, against his will. After a particularly heated argument during Christmas holidays in 1881, his father, a pastor, ordered Vincent to leave. With this final break, he abandoned his family name and signed his canvases simply “Vincent”. He left for Paris and never returned to Holland. In Paris he came to know Paul Gauguin, whose paintings he greatly admired. The self-portrait was the main subject of Vincent’s work from 1886c88. In February 1888 Vincent left Paris for Arles and tried to persuade Gauguin to join him. The months of waiting for Gauguin were the most productive time in van Gogh’s life. He wanted to show his friend as many pictures as possible and decorate the Yellow House. But Gauguin did not share his views on art and finally returned to Paris. On 7 January, 1889, fourteen days after his famous self-mutilation, Vincent left the hospital where he was convalescing. Although he hoped to recover from and to forget his madness, but he actually came back twice more in the same year. During his last stay in hospital, Vincent painted landscapes in which he recreated the world of his childhood. It is said that Vincent van Gogh shot himself in the side in a field but decided to return to the inn and went to bed. The landlord informed Dr Gachet and his brother Theo, who described the last moments of his life which ended on 29 July, 1890: “I wanted to die. While I was sitting next to him promising that we would try to heal him. [...], he answered, ‘La tristesse durera toujours (The sadness will last forever).’”
Van Gogh
Author: Julian Bell
Publisher: New Harvest
ISBN: 0544343735
Pages: 176
Year: 2015-01-06
View: 381
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From his mental breakdowns and bitter family relations to his struggles with art dealers, contrasts the self-taught artist's dark personal life with the radiance of his visionary artistic creations.
Van Gogh
Author: Enrica Crispino
Publisher: The Oliver Press, Inc.
ISBN: 1934545058
Pages: 64
Year: 2008-01-01
View: 1168
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A profile of the life of Vincent van Gogh that also focuses on his art, including the development of his signature technique, the artists and styles that inspired him, and how life events influenced the subjects he selected.
Leaving Van Gogh
Author: Carol Wallace
Publisher: Spiegel & Grau
ISBN: 1588369439
Pages: 288
Year: 2011-04-19
View: 291
Read: 833
In the summer of 1890, in the French town of Auvers-sur-Oise, Vincent van Gogh shot himself in the chest with a revolver. He died two days later, at the age of thirty-seven, largely unknown despite having completed over two thousand works of art that would go on to become some of the most important and valued in the world. In this riveting novel, Carol Wallace brilliantly navigates the mysteries surrounding the master artist’s death, relying on meticulous research to paint an indelible portrait of Van Gogh’s final days—and the friendship that may or may not have destroyed him. Telling Van Gogh’s story from an utterly new perspective—that of his personal physician, Dr. Gachet, specialist in mental illness and great lover of the arts—Wallace allows us to view the legendary painter as we’ve never seen him before. In our narrator’s eyes, Van Gogh is an irresistible puzzle, a man whose mind, plagued by demons, poses the most potentially rewarding challenge of Gachet’s career. Wallace’s narrative brims with suspense and rich psychological insight as it tackles haunting questions about Van Gogh’s fate. A masterly, gripping novel that explores the price of creativity, Leaving Van Gogh is a luminous story about what it means to live authentically, and the power and limits of friendship. From the Hardcover edition.
Vincent Van Gogh
Author: Stuart Morris
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 132
Year: 2008
View: 336
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Few artists command such fervent devotion amongst art lovers and such high prices in the salerooms of the art world. Love him or hate him, van Gogh is one of a handful of artists who is now a cultural event. Morris's study concentrates on the paintings first, and employs van Gogh's eloquent letters as an sthetic reference point. Much of the book is concerned with metacriticism - the way van Gogh has been critically received over the years.
Van Gogh
Author: Michael Howard
Publisher:
ISBN: 075481954X
Pages: 256
Year: 2010-02-01
View: 607
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Vincent van Gogh produced over 2000 works of art during his short career, but did not achieve fame as an artist until after his death. He led a troubled life, dealing with commercial failure, difficult personal relationships and eventually mental illness, culminating in his suicide in 1890. He made little money from his art during his lifetime, but his paintings are now some of the best-known and most expensive works in the world. The first half of this fascinating new book contains a detailed exploration of van Gogh's life, including his background, early career, influences and relationships. Beginning with his birth in the Netherlands in 1853, it details his childhood, family life, education and work-life before he began painting in 1880. Initially influenced by the Impressionist artists whose work he encountered during his time in Paris, van Gogh played a huge role in shaping the development of modern art, as an early pioneer of what came to be known as Expressionism. His influences and achievements are explained clearly and comprehensively with informative and attractive illustrations throughout. The second half of the book comprises a beautifully illustrated and comprehensive gallery, presenting over 280 full colour representations of his significant works, from his early sketches and paintings to the hugely famous Sunflowers, Irises and The Starry Night. These superb reproductions are accompanied by thorough analysis of each painting and its significance within the context of van Gogh's life, his technique and his body of work as a whole. This comprehensive new book is an essential volume for anyone who wants to learn more about this intriguing artist, and to survey their greatest works in one beautfully illustrated collection.
Van Gogh
Author: Vincent van Gogh
Publisher: Parkstone International
ISBN: 178042227X
Pages: 256
Year: 2011-07-01
View: 1326
Read: 445
Vincent van Gogh’s life and work are so intertwined that it is hardly possible to observe one without thinking of the other. Van Gogh has indeed become the incarnation of the suffering, misunderstood martyr of modern art, the emblem of the artist as an outsider. An article, published in 1890, gave details about van Gogh’s illness. The author of the article saw the painter as “a terrible and demented genius, often sublime, sometimes grotesque, always at the brink of the pathological.” Very little is known about Vincent’s childhood. At the age of eleven he had to leave “the human nest”, as he called it himself, for various boarding schools. The first portrait shows us van Gogh as an earnest nineteen year old. At that time he had already been at work for three years in The Hague and, later, in London in the gallery Goupil & Co. In 1874 his love for Ursula Loyer ended in disaster and a year later he was transferred to Paris, against his will. After a particularly heated argument during Christmas holidays in 1881, his father, a pastor, ordered Vincent to leave. With this final break, he abandoned his family name and signed his canvases simply “Vincent”. He left for Paris and never returned to Holland. In Paris he came to know Paul Gauguin, whose paintings he greatly admired. The self-portrait was the main subject of Vincent’s work from 1886c88. In February 1888 Vincent left Paris for Arles and tried to persuade Gauguin to join him. The months of waiting for Gauguin were the most productive time in van Gogh’s life. He wanted to show his friend as many pictures as possible and decorate the Yellow House. But Gauguin did not share his views on art and finally returned to Paris. On 7 January, 1889, fourteen days after his famous self-mutilation, Vincent left the hospital where he was convalescing. Although he hoped to recover from and to forget his madness, but he actually came back twice more in the same year. During his last stay in hospital, Vincent painted landscapes in which he recreated the world of his childhood. It is said that Vincent van Gogh shot himself in the side in a field but decided to return to the inn and went to bed. The landlord informed Dr Gachet and his brother Theo, who described the last moments of his life which ended on 29 July, 1890: “I wanted to die. While I was sitting next to him promising that we would try to heal him. [...], he answered, ‘La tristesse durera toujours (The sadness will last forever).’”
Van Gogh
Author: Belinda Thomson
Publisher: Harry N Abrams Incorporated
ISBN: 0810967383
Pages: 108
Year: 2001
View: 323
Read: 192
Features works to accompany an exhibition organized by the Art Institute of Chicago with the Van Gogh Museum of Amsterdam.
In the Garden with Van Gogh
Author: Julie Merberg, Suzanne Bober
Publisher: Chronicle Books
ISBN: 0811834158
Pages: 22
Year: 2002-03-01
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Set against the backdrop of well-known works by the artist, Vincent Van Gogh, rhyming text tells a story from the artwork.
Van Gogh in Saint-Rémy and Auvers
Author: Ronald Pickvance
Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art
ISBN: 0870994778
Pages: 325
Year: 1986-01-01
View: 1251
Read: 369

The Glory of Van Gogh
Author: Nathalie Heinich
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691021228
Pages: 218
Year: 1997
View: 305
Read: 540
The image of the great artist as a suffering visionary is a recent invention, observes sociologist Nathalie Heinich--an invention rooted in the "canonization" of Vincent van Gogh as a cultural hero for the twentieth century. Heinich explores how and why the impoverished and mentally tormented van Gogh came to be glorified shortly after his suicide at the age of 37. Did the secular art world need a rebel-saint of its own? In considering this possibility, the author explores the history of efforts to celebrate van Gogh, whether in biographies or on T-shirts, showing how the details of his life have been constructed according to the pattern of a Christian saint's rise to recognition. These biographical details circulated first as anecdotes, then as historical truths, and finally became legendary motifs defining individual greatness. At the time of van Gogh's death, early modernists hailed the work of this self-taught painter as that of a reforming prophet. Public interest stirred when the unique and tragic aspects of the artist's personal life came to light. In these stories, the figure of Van Gogh oscillated between godlike asceticism (he lived on very little, did not get married, did not eat much, and devoted his life to his work) and demonic frenzy (he drank, he went to brothels, and offered a piece of his own flesh, his severed ear, to a prostitute). His legend became one of victim and sacrificer, of an accursed artist who gave the world great paintings but paid the heavy price of society's ignorance. Heinich organizes her book around the stages that characterize the life of a saint-deviation, renewal, reconciliation, and pilgrimage, the latter culminating in visits to van Gogh's burial site and the competition to buy his paintings or "relics." Heinich explores the economics of the art market and the themes that make up the van Gogh myth, such as the personalization of artistic grandeur, the celebration of the interiority of the creator, and the glorification of abnormality. By examining the mythology that helps drive artistic investment, she forces us to reconsider the nature of admiration and particularly the notion that obscurity during an artist's lifetime is a guarantee of true genius.