Upcountry South Carolina Goes To War Letters Of The Anderson Brockman And Moore Families 1853 1865 Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War
Author: Tom Moore Craig
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 1611171105
Pages: 224
Year: 2012-06-05
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Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War chronicles the lives and concerns of the Anderson, Brockman, and Moore families of piedmont South Carolina during the late-antebellum and Civil War eras through 124 letters dated 1853 to 1865. The letters provide valuable firsthand accounts of evolving attitudes toward the war as conveyed between battlefronts and the home front, and they also express rich details about daily life in both environments. As the men of service age from each family join the Confederate ranks and write from military camps in Virginia and the Carolinas, they describe combat in some of the war's more significant battles. Though the surviving combatants remain staunch patriots to the Southern cause until the bitter end, readers witness in their letters the waning of initial enthusiasm in the face of the realities of warfare. The corresponding letters from the home front offer a more pragmatic assessment of the period and its hardships. Emblematic of the fates of many Southern families, the experiences of these representative South Carolinians are dramatically illustrated in their letters from the eve of the Civil War through its conclusion.
Living a Big War in a Small Place
Author: Philip N. Racine
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 1611172985
Pages: 136
Year: 2013-11-15
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Most of what we know about how the Civil War affected life in the Confederacy is related to cities, troop movements, battles, and prominent political, economic, or military leaders. Far less is known about the people who lived in small Southern towns remote from marching armies or battles. Philip N. Racine explores life in one such place—Spartanburg, South Carolina—in an effort to reshape the contours of that great conflict. By 1864 life in most of the Confederacy, but especially in rural towns, was characterized by scarcity, high prices, uncertainty, fear, and bad-tempered neighbors. Shortages of food were common. People lived with constant anxiety that a soldiering father or son would be killed or wounded. Taxes were high, inflation was rampant, good news was scarce and seemed to always be followed by bad. The slave population was growing restive as their masters’ bad news was their good news. Army deserters were threatening lawlessness; accusations and vindictiveness colored the atmosphere and added to the anxiety, fear, and feeling of helplessness. Often people blamed their troubles on the Confederate government in faraway Richmond, Virginia. Racine provides insight into these events through personal stories: the plight of a slave; the struggles of a war widow managing her husband’s farm, ten slaves, and seven children; and the trauma of a lowcountry refugee’s having to forfeit a wealthy, aristocratic way of life and being thrust into relative poverty and an alien social world. All were part of the complexity of wartime Spartanburg District.
Trace
Author: Lauret Savoy
Publisher: Counterpoint
ISBN: 1619026686
Pages: 240
Year: 2015-11-01
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Winner of the ASLE Creative Writing Award Winner of the American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation Finalist for the PEN American Open Book Award Finalist for the Phillis Wheatley Book Award Shortlisted for the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing Shortlisted for the Orion Book Award "I stand in awe of Lauret Savoy's wisdom and compassionate intelligence. Trace is a crucial book for our time, a bound sanity, not a forgiveness, but a reckoning." ––Terry Tempest Williams Sand and stone are Earth's fragmented memory. Each of us, too, is a landscape inscribed by memory and loss. One life-defining lesson Lauret Savoy learned as a young girl was this: the American land did not hate. As an educator and Earth historian, she has tracked the continent’s past from the relics of deep time; but the paths of ancestors toward her—paths of free and enslaved Africans, colonists from Europe, and peoples indigenous to this land—lie largely eroded and lost. In this provocative and powerful mosaic of personal journeys and historical inquiry across a continent and time, Savoy explores how the country’s still unfolding history, and ideas of “race,” have marked her and the land. From twisted terrain within the San Andreas Fault zone to a South Carolina plantation, from national parks to burial grounds, from “Indian Territory” and the U.S.-Mexico Border to the U.S. capital, Trace grapples with a searing national history to reveal the often unvoiced presence of the past. In distinctive and illuminating prose that is attentive to the rhythms of language and landscapes, she weaves together human stories of migration, silence, and displacement, as epic as the continent they survey, with uplifted mountains, braided streams, and eroded canyons.
Veterans North and South: The Transition from Soldier to Civilian after the American Civil War
Author: Paul A. Cimbala
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 031303821X
Pages: 189
Year: 2015-07-14
View: 667
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Based largely on Civil War veterans' own words, this book documents how many of these men survived the extraordinary horrors and hardships of war with surprising resilience and went on to become productive members of their communities in their post-war lives. • Documents how Civil War veterans' combat experience changed them in ways that allowed them to become productive members of their communities and leaders in their sections—a largely overlooked "benefit" to the war • Identifies overarching trends among veterans' experiences while also underscoring how varied Civil War soldiers' experiences were, depending on which side they fought for, where they fought, and their socioeconomic status
Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War
Author: Tom Moore Craig (Jr)
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 225
Year:
View: 260
Read: 896
Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War chronicles the lives and concerns of the Anderson, Brockman, and Moore families of piedmont South Carolina during the late-antebellum and Civil War eras through 124 letters dated 1853 to 1865. The letters provide valuable firsthand accounts of evolving attitudes toward the war as conveyed between battlefronts and the home front, and they also express rich details about daily life in both environments. As the men of service age from each family join the Confederate ranks and write from military camps in Virginia and the Carolinas, they describe combat in some of the warâs more significant battles. Though the surviving combatants remain staunch patriots to the Southern cause until the bitter end, readers witness in their letters the waning of initial enthusiasm in the face of the realities of warfare. The corresponding letters from the home front offer a more pragmatic assessment of the period and its hardships. Emblematic of the fates of many Southern families, the experiences of these representative South Carolinians are dramatically illustrated in their letters from the eve of the Civil War through its conclusion.
The Southern Historian
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 2011
View: 865
Read: 761

Directory of Scots in the Carolinas, 1680-1830
Author: David Dobson
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806352310
Pages: 160
Year: 2009-03
View: 1180
Read: 627
Lists of Scots who were permanent settlers in the Carolinas.
The Politics of Taste in Antebellum Charleston
Author: Maurie D. McInnis
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469625997
Pages: 424
Year: 2015-12-01
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At the close of the American Revolution, Charleston, South Carolina, was the wealthiest city in the new nation, with the highest per-capita wealth among whites and the largest number of enslaved residents. Maurie D. McInnis explores the social, political, and material culture of the city to learn how--and at what human cost--Charleston came to be regarded as one of the most refined cities in antebellum America. While other cities embraced a culture of democracy and egalitarianism, wealthy Charlestonians cherished English notions of aristocracy and refinement, defending slavery as a social good and encouraging the growth of southern nationalism. Members of the city's merchant-planter class held tight to the belief that the clothes they wore, the manners they adopted, and the ways they designed house lots and laid out city streets helped secure their place in social hierarchies of class and race. This pursuit of refinement, McInnis demonstrates, was bound up with their determined efforts to control the city's African American majority. She then examines slave dress, mobility, work spaces, and leisure activities to understand how Charleston slaves negotiated their lives among the whites they served. The textures of lives lived in houses, yards, streets, and public spaces come into dramatic focus in this lavishly illustrated portrait of antebellum Charleston. McInnis's innovative history of the city combines the aspirations of its would-be nobility, the labors of the African slaves who built and tended the town, and the ambitions of its architects, painters, writers, and civic promoters.
Disney Princess Royally Enchanted Cartoon Tales
Author: Disney Book Group, Scott Peterson
Publisher: Disney Press
ISBN: 0786837152
Pages: 192
Year: 2006-05-29
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Interweaves comic strips with blocks of prose to create stories for young readers which include the characters from "Cinderella," "Snow White," and "Sleeping Beauty."
History of Spartanburg County [South Carolina]
Author: John B. O. Landrum
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806347325
Pages: 739
Year: 2009-06-01
View: 1156
Read: 224
This scarce work should be of interest to all researchers with early Tennessee ancestors inasmuch as it covers the controversial period prior to statehood when the settlement in eastern Tennessee was under quasi-independent rule. One such controversy involved the creation in 1784 by John Sevier and others of a separate, self-governing territorial unit from lands in western North Carolina known as the State of Franklin. The Franklin episode, and all of its participants, is the subject of this volume.
Controversy and Hope
Author: Julian Cox
Publisher: University of South Carolina Press
ISBN:
Pages: 125
Year: 2013
View: 508
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"In cooperation with the estate of James Karales and Rebekah Jacob Gallery, Charleston."
Scientific Babel
Author: Michael D. Gordin
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022600032X
Pages: 424
Year: 2015-04-13
View: 738
Read: 284
English is the language of science today. No matter which languages you know, if you want your work seen, studied, and cited, you need to publish in English. But that hasn’t always been the case. Though there was a time when Latin dominated the field, for centuries science has been a polyglot enterprise, conducted in a number of languages whose importance waxed and waned over time—until the rise of English in the twentieth century. So how did we get from there to here? How did French, German, Latin, Russian, and even Esperanto give way to English? And what can we reconstruct of the experience of doing science in the polyglot past? With Scientific Babel, Michael D. Gordin resurrects that lost world, in part through an ingenious mechanism: the pages of his highly readable narrative account teem with footnotes—not offering background information, but presenting quoted material in its original language. The result is stunning: as we read about the rise and fall of languages, driven by politics, war, economics, and institutions, we actually see it happen in the ever-changing web of multilingual examples. The history of science, and of English as its dominant language, comes to life, and brings with it a new understanding not only of the frictions generated by a scientific community that spoke in many often mutually unintelligible voices, but also of the possibilities of the polyglot, and the losses that the dominance of English entails. Few historians of science write as well as Gordin, and Scientific Babel reveals his incredible command of the literature, language, and intellectual essence of science past and present. No reader who takes this linguistic journey with him will be disappointed.
The Story of Fort Myers
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 348
Year: 1949
View: 395
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With Amusement for All
Author: LeRoy Ashby
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813123976
Pages: 648
Year: 2006
View: 409
Read: 559
With Amusement for All contextualizes what Americans have done for fun since 1830, showing the reciprocal nature of the relationships among social, political, economic, and cultural forces and the ways in which the entertainment world has reflected, changed, or reinforced the values of American society.
Repairing the "March of Mars"
Author: John Samuel Apperson
Publisher: Mercer University Press
ISBN: 0865547793
Pages: 654
Year: 2001
View: 1312
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"There are many collections of letters and Civil War memoirs available today, but very few offer in-depth information about the medical treatment of wounded soldiers. In Repairing the "March of Mars": The Civil War Diaries of John Samuel Apperson, Hospital Steward in the Stonewall Brigade, 1861-1865, editor John Herbert Roper provides an important supplement to this largely ignored aspect of the Civil War." "Apperson's diary is a sensitive and painstaking observation of the details of medical treatment during and after battle. For all periods of the war, his detailed personal records supplement and correct official army hospital records, and for certain periods, his diary provides the only medical information available. For example, Apperson was present at the amputation of Stonewall Jackson's arm, and his diary shows that Jackson died of postoperative pneumonia, and not of a botched surgery."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved