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Prison School
Author: Akira Hiramoto
Publisher: Yen Press
ISBN: 0316442879
Pages: 384
Year: 2018-06-26
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Ever since Meiko regressed to a child-like state, she's lost the monstrous strength that made her the ultimate jailer. But now, more than ever, Kiyoshi and Mari need to bring back the old Meiko. Can they revive the old Shadow Student Council vice president buried deep within and take down the Official Student Council?
The Prison School
Author: Lizbet Simmons
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520293142
Pages: 216
Year: 2016-11-22
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Public schools across the nation have turned to the criminal justice system as a gold standard of discipline. As public schools and offices of justice have become collaborators in punishment, rates of African American suspension and expulsion have soared, dropout rates have accelerated, and prison populations have exploded. Nowhere, perhaps, has the War on Crime been more influential in broadening racialized academic and socioeconomic disparity than in New Orleans, Louisiana, where in 2002 the criminal sheriff opened his own public school at the Orleans Parish Prison. “The Prison School,” as locals called it, enrolled low-income African American boys who had been removed from regular public schools because of nonviolent disciplinary offenses, such as tardiness and insubordination. By examining this school in the local and national context, Lizbet Simmons shows how young black males are in the liminal state of losing educational affiliation while being caught in the net of correctional control. In The Prison School, she asks how schools and prisons became so intertwined. What does this mean for students, communities, and a democratic society? And how do we unravel the ties that bind the racialized realities of school failure and mass incarceration?
The Prison School
Author: Lizbet Simmons
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520293142
Pages: 216
Year: 2016-11-22
View: 1088
Read: 608
Public schools across the nation have turned to the criminal justice system as a gold standard of discipline. As public schools and offices of justice have become collaborators in punishment, rates of African American suspension and expulsion have soared, dropout rates have accelerated, and prison populations have exploded. Nowhere, perhaps, has the War on Crime been more influential in broadening racialized academic and socioeconomic disparity than in New Orleans, Louisiana, where in 2002 the criminal sheriff opened his own public school at the Orleans Parish Prison. “The Prison School,” as locals called it, enrolled low-income African American boys who had been removed from regular public schools because of nonviolent disciplinary offenses, such as tardiness and insubordination. By examining this school in the local and national context, Lizbet Simmons shows how young black males are in the liminal state of losing educational affiliation while being caught in the net of correctional control. In The Prison School, she asks how schools and prisons became so intertwined. What does this mean for students, communities, and a democratic society? And how do we unravel the ties that bind the racialized realities of school failure and mass incarceration?
Compulsory
Author: Sabina E. Vaught
Publisher:
ISBN: 0816696217
Pages: 392
Year: 2017-01-31
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"This is an American story, unsettled by contradictions, constituted by unresolvable loss and open-ended hope, produced through brutal exclusivities and persistent insurgencies. This is the story of Lincoln prison." In her Introduction, Sabina E. Vaught passionately details why the subject of prisons and prison schooling is so important. An unprecedented institutional ethnography of race and gender power in one state's juvenile prison school system, Compulsory will have major implications for public education everywhere. Vaught argues that through its educational apparatus, the state disproportionately removes young Black men from their homes and subjects them to the abuses of captivity. She explores the various legal and ideological forces shaping juvenile prison and prison schooling, and examines how these forces are mechanized across multiple state apparatuses, not least school. Drawing richly on ethnographic data, she tells stories that map the repression of rightless, incarcerated youth, whose state captivity is the contemporary expression of age-old practices of child removal and counterinsurgency. Through a theoretically rigorous analysis of the daily experiences of prisoners, teachers, state officials, mothers, and more, Compulsory provides vital insight into the broad compulsory systems of schooling--both Inside prison and in the world Outside--asking readers to reconsider conventional understandings of the role, purpose, and value of state schooling today.
The School-to-Prison Pipeline
Author: Catherine Y. Kim, Daniel J. Losen, Damon T. Hewitt
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814763685
Pages: 229
Year: 2012-04-01
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Examines the relationship between the law and the school-to-prison pipeline, argues that law can be an effective weapon in the struggle to reduce the number of children caught, and discusses the consequences on families and communities.
Discipline & Punish
Author: Michel Foucault
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307819299
Pages: 352
Year: 2012-04-18
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In this brilliant work, the most influential philosopher since Sartre suggests that such vaunted reforms as the abolition of torture and the emergence of the modern penitentiary have merely shifted the focus of punishment from the prisoner's body to his soul.
Understanding, Dismantling, and Disrupting the Prison-to-School Pipeline
Author: Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Lori Latrice Martin, Roland W. Mitchell, Louisiana State University, Karen Bennett-Haron, Arash Daneshzadeh
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498534953
Pages: 290
Year: 2016-12-06
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This volume provides a concentrated and powerful dialogue about the nexus between schools, prisons, and the free-market economy whereby youth (particularly youth of color) are on fast tracks from schools to prisons. Written by leading and emerging academics in the field, the chapters in this collection challenge readers to contemplate the myth of post-raciality and the connections between schools and prisons.
The School to Prison Pipeline
Author: Nathern Okilwa, Muhammad Khalifa, Felecia Briscoe
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 1785601296
Pages: 215
Year: 2017
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This edited volume focuses on the role that school climate and disciplinary practices have on the educational and social experiences of students of color. Drawing from quantitative, qualitative, and theoretical studies, it brings to bear a number of topics such as racialized school experiences; criminology, discursive deviance and punishment and carceral studies; urban studies; school administration and leadership; and, a number of critical theorist frameworks. Practical insights are offered to assist administrators, teachers, school counsellors, and other school and non-school based professionals on how to address not only disparities in school discipline, but also create and promote an inclusive, affirming positive school culture and climate. With applications in disciplinary studies and criminology, leadership studies, critical race theory and other critical frameworks, this volume is a valuable resource advancing new theoretical concepts.
The Prison Boundary
Author: Jennifer Turner
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137532424
Pages: 248
Year: 2016-07-13
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This book explores the idea of the prison boundary, identifying where it is located, which processes and performances help construct and animate it, and who takes part in them. Although the relationship between prison and non-prison has garnered academic interest from various disciplines in the last decade, the cultural performance of the boundary has been largely ignored. This book adds to the field by exploring the complexity of the material and symbolic connections that exist between society and carceral space. Drawing on a range of cultural examples including governmental legislation, penal tourism, prisoner work programmes and art by offenders, Jennifer Turner attends to the everyday, practised manifestations and negotiations of the prison boundary. The book reveals how prisoners actively engage with life outside of prison and how members of the public may cross the boundary to the inside. In doing so, it shows the prison boundary to be a complex patchwork of processes, people and parts. The book will be of great interest to scholars and upper-level students of criminology, carceral geography and cultural studies.
The School-to-Prison Pipeline: Education, Discipline, and Racialized Double Standards
Author: Nancy A Heitzeg
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440831122
Pages: 178
Year: 2016-04-11
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This book offers a research and comparison-driven look at the school-to-prison pipeline, its racial dynamics, the connections to mass incarceration, and our flawed educational climate—and suggests practical remedies for change. • Provides readers with an understanding of the realities of the school-to-prison pipeline—its history, development, and racialized context and meaning—as well as the continued significance of race and other socially differentiating factors in shaping public policy and everyday decisions regarding "deviance," "discipline," and social control • Examines the under-explored dynamic that places a predominantly white teaching staff in schools that are predominantly schools of color, and considers the roles that stereotypes and cultural conflicts play in the labeling of students • Suggests viable options for action towards dismantling the institutionalized racism revealed by the school-to-prison pipeline via both policy reforms and transformational alternatives • Presents information relevant to a range of college courses, such as education, sociology of deviance, sociology of education, youth studies, legal studies, criminal justice, and racial/ethnic studies
Why Don't Students Like School?
Author: Daniel T. Willingham
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470730455
Pages: 240
Year: 2009-06-10
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Easy-to-apply, scientifically-based approaches for engaging students in the classroom Cognitive scientist Dan Willingham focuses his acclaimed research on the biological and cognitive basis of learning. His book will help teachers improve their practice by explaining how they and their students think and learn. It reveals-the importance of story, emotion, memory, context, and routine in building knowledge and creating lasting learning experiences. Nine, easy-to-understand principles with clear applications for the classroom Includes surprising findings, such as that intelligence is malleable, and that you cannot develop "thinking skills" without facts How an understanding of the brain's workings can help teachers hone their teaching skills "Mr. Willingham's answers apply just as well outside the classroom. Corporate trainers, marketers and, not least, parents -anyone who cares about how we learn-should find his book valuable reading." —Wall Street Journal
The Palgrave Handbook of Prison Ethnography
Author: Deborah H. Drake, Rod Earle, J. Sloan
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137403888
Pages: 514
Year: 2016-01-12
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The Palgrave Handbook of Prison Ethnography provides an expansive overview of the challenges presented by qualitative, and particularly ethnographic, enquiry. The chapters reflect upon the means by which ethnographers aim to gain understanding, make sense of what they learn and the way they represent their finished work. The Handbook offers urgent insights relevant to current trends in the growth of imprisonment worldwide. In an era of mass incarceration, human-centric ethnography provides an important counter to quantitative analysis and the audit culture on which prisons are frequently judged. The Handbook is divided into four parts. Part I ('About Prison Ethnography') assesses methodological, theoretical and pragmatic issues related to the use of ethnographic and qualitative enquiry in prisons. Part II ('Through Prison Ethnography') considers the significance of ethnographic insights in terms of wider social or political concerns. Part III ('Of Prison Ethnography') analyses different aspects of the roles ethnographers take and how they negotiate their research settings. Part IV ('For Prison Ethnography') includes contributions that convincingly extend the value of prison ethnography beyond the prison itself. Bringing together contributions by some of the world's leading scholars in criminology and prison studies, this authoritative volume maps out new directions for future research. It will be an indispensable resource for practitioners, students, academics and researchers who use qualitative social research methods to further their understanding of prisons.
From Black Power to Prison Power
Author: D. Tibbs
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137013060
Pages: 260
Year: 2012-01-02
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This book uses the landmark case Jones v. North Carolina Prisoners' Labor Union to examine the strategies of prison inmates using race and radicalism to inspire the formation of an inmate labor union.
Lockdown High: When the Schoolhouse Becomes a Jailhouse
Author: Annette Fuentes
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 184467407X
Pages: 226
Year: 2013-02-12
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A riveting report on the overblown fear of violence that turns American schools into prisons and students into suspects. School violence has fallen steadily for twenty years. Yet in schools throughout the United States, Annette Fuentes finds metal detectors and drug tests for aspirin, police profiling of students with no records, arbitrary expulsions, armed teachers, increased policing, and all-seeing electronic surveillance. This climate of fear has permitted the imposition of unprecedented restrictions on young people’s rights, dignity, and educational freedoms. In what many call the school-to-prison pipeline, the policing and practices of the juvenile justice system increasingly infiltrate the schoolhouse. These “zero tolerance” measures push the most vulnerable and academically needy students out of the classroom and into harm’s way. Fuentes’s moving stories will astonish and anger readers, as she makes the case that the public schools of the twenty-first century reflect a society with an unhealthy fixation on crime, security and violence.
Liberating Minds
Author: Ellen Condliffe Lagemann
Publisher: New Press, The
ISBN: 1620971232
Pages: 256
Year: 2017-02-07
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Anthony Cardenales was a stickup artist in the Bronx before spending seventeen years in prison. Today he is a senior manager at a recycling plant in Westchester, New York. He attributes his ability to turn his life around to the college degree he earned in prison. Many college-in-prison graduates achieve similar success and the positive ripple effects for their families and communities, and for the country as a whole, are dramatic. College-in-prison programs greatly reduce recidivism, leading to potential savings in the staggering cost of prisons. They increase post-prison employment, allowing the formerly incarcerated to better support their families and to reintegrate successfully into their communities, providing positive role models. College programs also decrease violence within prisons, improving conditions for both correction officers and the incarcerated. Liberating Minds eloquently makes the case for these multiple benefits and also tells the stories of many formerly incarcerated college students and the remarkable transformations in their lives. Both access to college for all Americans and criminal justice reform are high on today’s national policy agenda. Liberating Minds argues that it is imperative, both for prisoners themselves and for society, that access to higher education be extended to include the incarcerated. As the country faces a legacy of decades of over-incarceration, offering college behind bars provides a corrective on the path back to a more democratic and humane society.