Le Roi Tue Par Un Cochon Une Mort Infame Aux Origines Des Emblemes De La France Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Le Roi tué par un cochon. Une mort infâme aux origines des emblèmes de la France ?
Author: Michel Pastoureau
Publisher: Le Seuil
ISBN: 2021296415
Pages: 270
Year: 2015-09-03T00:00:00+02:00
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Le bleu est la couleur de la France. Dans ce rôle ses origines sont anciennes : elles se situent vers le milieu du XIIe siècle, lorsque le roi Louis VII adopte deux attributs de la Vierge, le lis et l'azur, pour en faire les premières armoiries royales. Par ce choix, non seulement il rend hommage à la mère du Christ, patronne du royaume, mais surtout il tente d'effacer le souvenir d'une mort infâme qui, quelque temps plus tôt, a souillé tout ensemble la dynastie capétienne et la monarchie française : celle de son frère aîné Philippe, jeune roi de quinze ans, déjà sacré et associé au trône, tombé de cheval le 13 octobre 1131 à cause d'un misérable cochon de ferme vagabondant dans une rue de Paris. L'ouvrage de Michel Pastoureau raconte cet événement insolite, oublié de tous les livres d'histoire, et étudie dans la longue durée ses multiples conséquences. À bien des égards, cet accident provoqué par un animal impur et méprisé, que les chroniques qualifient de porcus diabolicus, loin d'être anecdotique, apparaît comme un événement fondateur.
Le chevalier, la femme et le prêtre
Author: Georges Duby
Publisher:
ISBN: 2375357701
Pages:
Year: 1981
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Saint Louis
Author: Jacques Le Goff
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 947
Year: 2009
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"Life of a king, life of a saint, life of a man. In this work, Jacques LeGoff, one of the truly great medieval historians of our times, magisterially plumbs the depths of the fundamental contradiction of Saint Louis: is it possible to be both a king and a saint? St. Louis lies at the intersection of reasons of state and divine reason; he is an individual around whom LeGoff turns like a detective searching for an ever-elusive truth, that of a life and a legend inextricably intertwined. A fine, eminently readable translation. " --Robert J. Morrissey, University of Chicago Canonized in 1297 as Saint Louis, King Louis IX of France (1214-1270) was the central figure of Christendom in the thirteenth century. He ruled when France was at the height of power; he commanded the largest army in Europe and controlled the wealthiest kingdom. Renowned for his patronage of the arts, Louis was equally famous for his decision to imitate the suffering Christ as a humbly attired, bearded penitent. Armed with the considerable resources of the nouvel historien, Jacques Le Goff mines existing materials about Saint Louis to forge a new historical biography of the king. Part of his ambitious project is to reconstruct the mental universe of the thirteenth century: Le Goff describes the scholastic and intellectual background of Louis' reign and, most importantly, he discusses methodology and the interpretation of written sources--their composition, provenance, and reliability. Le Goff divides his unconventional biography into three parts. In the first, he gives us the contours of Louis' life from birth to death in the usual context of family dynamics and genealogy, courtly and regional politics, and shifts in economic, social, and cultural life. In sifting through the historical accounts of the king's life, Le Goff determines that it is Louis IX's profound sense of moral and religious purpose--his desire to become the ideal Christian ruler--that colors his every action from boyhood on; it is also, for Le Goff, what renders contemporary accounts problematic and what necessitates further scrutiny. That dissection of sources occupies the second part. Le Goff's intention is to pare away the layers of homily and anecdote produced by the king's early biographers to discover the true Saint Louis. Questioning whether Saint Louis was merely the invention of his eulogists, Le Goff penetrates beyond the literary and hagiographical evidence to the human behind the legend. He brilliantly analyzes Louis' progress toward his unique self-creation and its subsequent mythologizing. In the third part, Le Goff highlights the contradictions within Louis and his historical image that previous chroniclers have elided or overlooked. In the end, he leaves us with the saint, rather than the king, with all the paradoxes embedded in that role.
Being Here Is Everything
Author: Marie Darrieussecq
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 1635900085
Pages: 160
Year: 2017-10-20
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First published in France in 2016, Being Here Is So Much traces the short, obscure, and prolific life of the German expressionist painter Paula Modersohn-Becker (1876--1907). In a brief career, cut short by her death from an embolism at the age of thirty-one, shortly after she gave birth to a child, Modersohn-Becker trained in Germany, traveled often to Paris, developed close friendships with the sculptor Clara Westhoff and the poet Rainer Maria Rilke, and became one of her generation's preeminent artists, helping introduce modernity to the twentieth century alongside such other painters as Picasso and Matisse. Marie Darrieussecq's triumphant and illuminating biography at once revives Modersohn-Becker's reputation as a significant figure in modernism and sheds light on the extreme difficulty women have faced in attaining recognition and establishing artistic careers.
Vichy France
Author: Robert O. Paxton
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231124694
Pages: 415
Year: 2001
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A disturbing account of the Vichy period, demonstrating how in the interests of stability, French national feeling favored collboration with the German-controlled regime.
The Devil's Cloth
Author: Michel Pastoureau
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743453263
Pages: 144
Year: 2003-06-04
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A French scholar and author of Blue: The History of a Color presents a witty cultural and social history of stripes, from the medieval prejudice against stripes to the present day, looking at the frequently negative attitude and connotations of stripes. Reprint.
Blue
Author: Michel Pastoureau
Publisher:
ISBN: 0691181365
Pages: 216
Year: 2018-03
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A beautifully illustrated visual and cultural history of the color blue throughout the ages Blue has had a long and topsy-turvy history in the Western world. The ancient Greeks scorned it as ugly and barbaric, but most Americans and Europeans now cite it as their favorite color. In this fascinating history, the renowned medievalist Michel Pastoureau traces the changing meanings of blue from its rare appearance in prehistoric art to its international ubiquity today. Any history of color is, above all, a social history. Pastoureau investigates how the ever-changing role of blue in society has been reflected in manuscripts, stained glass, heraldry, clothing, paintings, and popular culture. Beginning with the almost total absence of blue from ancient Western art and language, the story moves to medieval Europe. As people began to associate blue with the Virgin Mary, the color became a powerful element in church decoration and symbolism. Blue gained new favor as a royal color in the twelfth century and became a formidable political and military force during the French Revolution. As blue triumphed in the modern era, new shades were created and blue became the color of romance and the blues. Finally, Pastoureau follows blue into contemporary times, when military clothing gave way to the everyday uniform of blue jeans and blue became the universal and unifying color of the Earth as seen from space. Beautifully illustrated, Blue tells the intriguing story of our favorite color and the cultures that have hated it, loved it, and made it essential to some of our greatest works of art.
Spill Simmer Falter Wither
Author: Sara Baume
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0544716221
Pages: 224
Year: 2016-03-08
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Winner of the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature * Winner of the Sunday Independent Newcomer of the Year Award * Short-listed for the Costa First Novel Award * Long-listed for the Desmond Elliott Prize * Long-listed for the Guardian First Book Award 2015, Readers’ Choice * Long-listed for the Warwick Prize for Writing 2015 * Long-listed for 2015 Edinburgh First Novel Award “A deeply attuned portrait of the human mind…An unsettling literary surprise of the best sort.”—Atlantic “This book is like a flame in daylight: beautiful and unexpected.”—Anne Enright It is springtime, and two outcasts—a man ignored, even shunned by his village, and the one-eyed dog he takes into his quiet, tightly shuttered life—find each other, by accident or fate, and forge an unlikely connection. As their friendship grows, their small, seaside town falsely perceives menace where there is only mishap—and the duo must take to the road. Gorgeously written in poetic and mesmerizing prose, Spill Simmer Falter Wither is one of those rare stories that utterly and completely imagines its way into a life most of us would never see. It transforms us in our understanding not only of the world, but also of ourselves. “A man-and-his-dog story like no other.”—San Francisco Chronicle “[Spill Simmer Falter Wither] hums with its own distinctiveness.”— Guardian (UK) “A tour de force...A stunning and wonderful achievement by a writer touched by greatness.” —Joseph O’Connor, for the Irish Times
Green
Author: Michel Pastoureau
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 069115936X
Pages: 240
Year: 2014-08-24
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In this beautiful and richly illustrated book, the acclaimed author of Blue and Black presents a fascinating and revealing history of the color green in European societies from prehistoric times to today. Examining the evolving place of green in art, clothes, literature, religion, science, and everyday life, Michel Pastoureau traces how culture has profoundly changed the perception and meaning of the color over millennia—and how we misread cultural, social, and art history when we assume that colors have always signified what they do today. Filled with entertaining and enlightening anecdotes, Green shows that the color has been ambivalent: a symbol of life, luck, and hope, but also disorder, greed, poison, and the devil. Chemically unstable, green pigments were long difficult to produce and even harder to fix. Not surprisingly, the color has been associated with all that is changeable and fleeting: childhood, love, and money. Only in the Romantic period did green definitively become the color of nature. Pastoureau also explains why the color was connected with the Roman emperor Nero, how it became the color of Islam, why Goethe believed it was the color of the middle class, why some nineteenth-century scholars speculated that the ancient Greeks couldn’t see green, and how the color was denigrated by Kandinsky and the Bauhaus. More broadly, Green demonstrates that the history of the color is, to a large degree, one of dramatic reversal: long absent, ignored, or rejected, green today has become a ubiquitous and soothing presence as the symbol of environmental causes and the mission to save the planet. With its striking design and compelling text, Green will delight anyone who is interested in history, culture, art, fashion, or media.

Red

Red
Author: Michel Pastoureau, Jody Gladding
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691172773
Pages: 216
Year: 2017-02-14
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The color red has represented many things, from the life force and the divine to love, lust, and anger. Up through the Middle Ages, red held a place of privilege in the Western world. For many cultures, red was not just one color of many but rather the only color worthy enough to be used for social purposes. In some languages, the word for red was the same as the word for color. The first color developed for painting and dying, red became associated in antiquity with war, wealth, and power. In the medieval period, red held both religious significance, as the color of the blood of Christ and the fires of Hell, and secular meaning, as a symbol of love, glory, and beauty. Yet during the Protestant Reformation, red began to decline in status. Viewed as indecent and immoral and linked to luxury and the excesses of the Catholic Church, red fell out of favor. After the French Revolution, red gained new respect as the color of progressive movements and radical left-wing politics. In this beautifully illustrated book, Michel Pastoureau, the acclaimed author of Blue, Black, and Green, now masterfully navigates centuries of symbolism and complex meanings to present the fascinating and sometimes controversial history of the color red. Pastoureau illuminates red's evolution through a diverse selection of captivating images, including the cave paintings of Lascaux, the works of Renaissance masters, and the modern paintings and stained glass of Mark Rothko and Josef Albers.
Black
Author: Michel Pastoureau
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 210
Year: 2009
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About the history of the color black, its various meanings and representations.
Place and Space in the Medieval World
Author: Meg Boulton, Jane Hawkes, Heidi Stoner
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315413639
Pages: 328
Year: 2017-12-05
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This book addresses the critical terminologies of place and space (and their role within medieval studies) in a considered and critical manner, presenting a scholarly introduction written by the editors alongside thematic case-studies that address a wide range of visual and textual material. The essays consider the extant visual and textual sources from the medieval period alongside contemporary scholarly discussions to examine place and space in their wider critical context, and are written by specialists in a range of disciplines including art history, archaeology, history and literature.
The Manara Library Volume 6
Author: Milo Manara, Diana Schutz, Alexandro Jodorowsky
Publisher:
ISBN: 1595827870
Pages: 224
Year: 2014-02
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Milo Manara and Alexandro Jodorowsky's (Metabarons, The Incal) sweeping saga of sex, blood, and religion is collected in a single volume for the first time, in the latest volume of The Manara Library! When Pope Innocent VIII dies, the corrupt, licentious Cardinal Rodrigo Borgia schemes, murders, and seduces his way into becoming the new pope and immediately secures positions for his family to ensure a Borgia dynasty. With breathtakingly beautiful painted artwork by Manara, this account of Italy's first Mafia family is among comics' - and history's - sexiest, most violent, and most engrossing epics!
"Sculpting Simulacra in Medieval Germany, 1250-1380 "
Author: Assaf Pinkus
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351549731
Pages: 264
Year: 2017-07-05
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Engaging with the imaginative, nonreligious response to Gothic sculpture in German-speaking lands and tracing high and late medieval notions of the ?living statue? and the simulacrum in religious, lay, and travel literature, this study explores the subjective and intuitive potential inherent in thirteenth- and fourteenth-century sculpture. It addresses a range of works, from the oeuvre of the so-called Naumburg Master through Freiburg-im-Breisgau to the imperial art of Vienna and Prague. As living simulacra, the sculptures offer themselves to the imaginative horizons of their viewers as factual presences that substitute for the real. In perceiving Gothic sculpture as a conscious alternative to the sacred imago, the book offers a new understanding of the function, production, and use of three-dimensional images in late medieval Germany. By blurring the boundaries between viewers and works of art, between the imaginary and the real, the sculptures invite the speculations of their viewers and in this way produce an unstable meaning, perpetually mutable and alive. The book constitutes the first art-historical attempt to theorize the idiosyncratic character of German Gothic sculpture - much of which has never been fully documented - and provides the first English-language survey of the historiography of these works.
Agent of Change
Author: Sabrina Alcorn Baron, Eric N. Lindquist, Eleanor F. Shevlin
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 1558495932
Pages: 442
Year: 2007
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Inspiring debate since the early days of its publication, Elizabeth L. Eisenstein's The Printing Press as an Agent of Change: Communications and Cultural Transformations in Early-Modern Europe (1979) has exercised its own force as an agent of change in the world of scholarship. Its path-breaking agenda has played a central role in shaping the study of print culture and "book history"--fields of inquiry that rank among the most exciting and vital areas of scholarly endeavor in recent years. Joining together leading voices in the field of print scholarship, this collection of twenty essays affirms the catalytic properties of Eisenstein's study as a stimulus to further inquiry across geographic, temporal, and disciplinary boundaries. From early modern marginalia to the use of architectural title pages in Renaissance books, from the press in Spanish colonial America to print in the Islamic world, from the role of the printed word in nation-building to changing histories of reading in the electronic age, this book addresses the legacy of Eisenstein's work in print culture studies today as it suggests future directions for the field. In addition to a conversation with Elizabeth L. Eisenstein, the book includes contributions by Peng Hwa Ang, Margaret Aston, Tony Ballantyne, Vivek Bhandari, Ann Blair, Barbara A. Brannon, Roger Chartier, Kai-wing Chow, James A. Dewar, Robert A. Gross, David Scott Kastan, Harold Love, Paula McDowell, Jane McRae, Jean-Dominique Mellot, Antonio Rodr'guez-Buckingham, Geoffrey Roper, William H. Sherman, Peter Stallybrass, H. Arthur Williamson, and Calhoun Winton.