Dictionnaire Kikongo Ya Leta Munukutuba Francais Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Dictionnaire kituba (kikongo ya leta)-anglais-français et vocabulaire français-kituba
Author: Harold Werner Fehderau
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 390
Year: 1992
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Dictionnaire kikongo (ya leta)-anglais-français et vocabulaire français-kituba
Author: Harold W.. Fehderau
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 323
Year: 1969
View: 576
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Dictionnaire kikongo (ya leta) -- anglais -- français
Author: Harold Werner Fehderau
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 323
Year: 1969
View: 199
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Pidgins and Creoles
Author: Jacques Arends, Pieter Muysken, Norval Smith
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing
ISBN: 902725236X
Pages: 412
Year: 1995
View: 585
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For review see: Geneviève Escure, in New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids, vol. 72, no. 1 & 2 (1998); p. 192-194. - For abstract see: Caribbean Abstracts, no. 7, 1995-1996 (1997); p. 11, no. 0018.
Voice of the Leopard
Author: Ivor L. Miller
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1604738146
Pages: 401
Year: 2010-01-06
View: 940
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In Voice of the Leopard: African Secret Societies and Cuba, Ivor L. Miller shows how African migrants and their political fraternities played a formative role in the history of Cuba. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, no large kingdoms controlled Nigeria and Cameroon's multilingual Cross River basin. Instead, each settlement had its own lodge of the initiation society called Ékpè, or "leopard," which was the highest indigenous authority. Ékpè lodges ruled local communities while also managing regional and long-distance trade. Cross River Africans, enslaved and forcibly brought to colonial Cuba, reorganized their Ékpè clubs covertly in Havana and Matanzas into a mutual-aid society called Abakuá, which became foundational to Cuba's urban life and music. Miller's extensive fieldwork in Cuba and West Africa documents ritual languages and practices that survived the Middle Passage and evolved into a unifying charter for transplanted slaves and their successors. To gain deeper understanding of the material, Miller underwent Ékpè initiation rites in Nigeria after ten years' collaboration with Abakuá initiates in Cuba and the United States. He argues that Cuban music, art, and even politics rely on complexities of these African-inspired codes of conduct and leadership. Voice of the Leopard is an unprecedented tracing of an African title-society to its Caribbean incarnation, which has deeply influenced Cuba's creative energy and popular consciousness. This book is sponsored by a grant from the InterAmericas(r)/Society of Arts and Letters of the Americas, a program of the Reed Foundation.
Topics in African Linguistics
Author: Salikoko S. Mufwene, Lioba Moshi
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing
ISBN: 9027277109
Pages: 304
Year: 1993-10-07
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The 16 papers in this volume are revised versions of papers presented at the conference; they represent the state of the art in various subfields of African linguistics into which the book is organized: (1) morphosyntax, (2) semantics, (3) phonology, and (4) language contact. The last part covers topics such as code-switching and mixing, pidginization/creolization, and language planning.The papers in Part I: Morphosyntax focus particularly on the verb and verb phrase in a variety of Niger-Congo languages, discussing several aspects of the verb morphology. The specific languages discussed include Kinande, Kilega, Kinyarwanda (Larry Hyman), Kikongo-Kituba (M. Ngalasso), Duala (E. Bilao), Yoruba (S.A. Lawal), Ewe (A.S. Allen), and Gbaya 'Bodoe (P. Roulon-Doko). The papers in Part II: Semantics discuss foundational questions regarding the proper/common noun distinction in two geographically very distant African languages, Gborbo Krahn (Janet Bing) in the west and Luo (Ben G. Blount) in the east, which follow yet very similar principles. And, despite differences in the titles, the papers on Kivunjo (Lioba Moshi) and Emai (Schaefer and Egbokhare) address the question of the semantic basis for assigning property concepts to different lexical categories. There are two papers in Part III: Phonology, which are mostly on the prosodic features of Chiyao (Al Mtenje) and Manding (J. Tourville). In Part IV: Language Contact, Eyamba Bokamba's and C. Meyers-Scotton's papers discuss speech variation and mostly formal constraints associated with them, while Helma Pasch compares segmental features of Sango and Yakoma in the Central African Republic to determine whether the former is a creole. Edmun Richmond focuses on the choice of national official language in sub-Saharan Africa. Except for Pasch all of them cover several languages and geographical areas.
The Bantu Bibliography
Author: Jouni Maho
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 844
Year: 2008
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Dictionary and Grammar of the Kongo Language, as Spoken at San Salvador, the Ancient Capital of the Old Kongo Empire, West Africa. Appendix
Author: William Holman Bentley, Baptist Missionary Society
Publisher: Andesite Press
ISBN: 1298569729
Pages: 346
Year: 2015-08-08
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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
Voice of the Leopard
Author: Ivor L. Miller
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1604738146
Pages: 401
Year: 2010-01-06
View: 707
Read: 700
In Voice of the Leopard: African Secret Societies and Cuba, Ivor L. Miller shows how African migrants and their political fraternities played a formative role in the history of Cuba. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, no large kingdoms controlled Nigeria and Cameroon's multilingual Cross River basin. Instead, each settlement had its own lodge of the initiation society called Ékpè, or "leopard," which was the highest indigenous authority. Ékpè lodges ruled local communities while also managing regional and long-distance trade. Cross River Africans, enslaved and forcibly brought to colonial Cuba, reorganized their Ékpè clubs covertly in Havana and Matanzas into a mutual-aid society called Abakuá, which became foundational to Cuba's urban life and music. Miller's extensive fieldwork in Cuba and West Africa documents ritual languages and practices that survived the Middle Passage and evolved into a unifying charter for transplanted slaves and their successors. To gain deeper understanding of the material, Miller underwent Ékpè initiation rites in Nigeria after ten years' collaboration with Abakuá initiates in Cuba and the United States. He argues that Cuban music, art, and even politics rely on complexities of these African-inspired codes of conduct and leadership. Voice of the Leopard is an unprecedented tracing of an African title-society to its Caribbean incarnation, which has deeply influenced Cuba's creative energy and popular consciousness. This book is sponsored by a grant from the InterAmericas(r)/Society of Arts and Letters of the Americas, a program of the Reed Foundation.
Dictionnaires Kikongo ya létà-français
Author: Nathalis Lembe Masiala
Publisher: Editions Publibook
ISBN: 2748361814
Pages: 278
Year: 2011-02-28
View: 642
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Très complet, ce dictionnaire bilingue kikongo-français vous épaulera dans votre pratique quotidienne des deux langues : que vous soyez novice dans l’une comme dans l’autre, vous trouverez ici des traductions à la fois concises et précises qui éradiqueront vos problèmes de compréhension. Historiques, points culturels, de prononciation et grammaticaux essentiels participent également à la richesse de l’ouvrage. Un outil indispensable, à posséder absolument. Ce dictionnaire offre autant la possibilité de découvrir le kikongo, langue peu parlée en Europe, que d’en améliorer sa pratique. Débutant ou confirmé, chacun y trouvera son compte. Cet ouvrage se démarque effectivement par l’originalité de la langue traitée et incite également le lecteur à entrer au coeur de son histoire, pour mieux en cerner les tenants et les aboutissants, tout en n’omettant pas de traiter la question de l’oralité. Aspects pratique et culturel se mêlent donc, pour une efficacité totale !
English-Congo and Congo-English Dictionary
Author: Henry Craven, John Barfield
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 248
Year: 1883
View: 459
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An Introduction to African Languages
Author: G. Tucker Childs
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing
ISBN: 9027295883
Pages: 265
Year: 2003-12-19
View: 1018
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This book introduces beginning students and non-specialists to the diversity and richness of African languages. In addition to providing a solid background to the study of African languages, the book presents linguistic phenomena not found in European languages. A goal of this book is to stimulate interest in African languages and address the question: What makes African languages so fascinating? The orientation adopted throughout the book is a descriptive one, which seeks to characterize African languages in a relatively succinct and neutral manner, and to make the facts accessible to a wide variety of readers. The author’s lengthy acquaintance with the continent and field experiences in western, eastern, and southern Africa allow for both a broad perspective and considerable depth in selected areas. The original examples are often the author’s own but also come from other sources and languages not often referenced in the literature. This text also includes a set of sound files illustrating the phenomena under discussion, be they the clicks of Khoisan, talking drums, or the ideophones (words like English lickety-split) found almost everywhere, which will make this book a valuable resource for teacher and student alike.
Cuba and Its Music
Author: Ned Sublette
Publisher: Chicago Review Press
ISBN: 1569764204
Pages: 688
Year: 2007-02-01
View: 987
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This entertaining history of Cuba and its music begins with the collision of Spain and Africa and continues through the era of Miguelito Valdes, Arsenio Rodriguez, Benny More, and Perez Prado. It offers a behind-the-scenes examination of music from a Cuban point of view, unearthing surprising, provocative connections and making the case that Cuba was fundamental to the evolution of music in the New World. The ways in which the music of black slaves transformed 16th-century Europe, how the "claves" appeared, and how Cuban music influenced ragtime, jazz, and rhythm and blues are revealed. Music lovers will follow this journey from Andalucia, the Congo, the Calabar, Dahomey, and Yorubaland via Cuba to Mexico, Puerto Rico, Saint-Domingue, New Orleans, New York, and Miami. The music is placed in a historical context that considers the complexities of the slave trade; Cuba's relationship to the United States; its revolutionary political traditions; the music of Santeria, Palo, Abakua, and Vodu; and much more.
Contact Languages
Author: Sarah Grey Thomason
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing
ISBN: 9027252394
Pages: 506
Year: 1997-01-01
View: 400
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This book contributes to a more balanced view of the most dramatic results of language contact by presenting linguistic and historical sketches of lesser-known contact languages. The twelve case studies offer eloquent testimony against the still common view that all contact languages are pidgins and creoles with maximally simple and essentially identical grammars. They show that some contact languages are neither pidgins nor creoles, and that even pidgins and creoles can display considerable structural diversity and structural complexity; they also show that two-language contact situations can give rise to pidgins, especially when access to a target language is withheld by its speakers. The chapters are arranged according to language type: three focus on pidgins (Hiri Motu, by Tom Dutton; Pidgin Delaware, by Ives Goddard; and Ndyuka-Trio Pidgin, by George L. Huttar and Frank J. Velantie), two on creoles (Kituba, by Salikoko S. Mufwene, and Sango, by Helma Pasch), one on a set of pidgins and creoles (Arabic-based contact languages, by Jonathan Owens), one on the question of early pidginization and/or creolization in Swahili (by Derek Nurse), and five on bilingual mixed languages (Michif, by Peter Bakker and Robert A. Papen; Media Lengua and Callahuaya, both by Pieter Muysken; and Mednyj Aleut and Ma'a, both by Sarah Thomason). The authors' collective goal is to help offset the traditional emphasis, within contact-language studies, on pidgins and creoles that arose as an immediate result of contact with Europeans, starting in the Age of Exploration. The accumulation of case studies on a wide diversity of languages is needed to create a body of knowledge substantial enough to support robust generalizations about the nature and development of all types of contact language.
Studies in the Linguistic Sciences
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1978
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